Hungary

Capital: Budapest
Population: 9.9 million
Currency: Forint
Official Language: Hungarian
Borders: Slovakia (North), Ukraine (East), Romania (South/East), Serbia (South), Croatia (South/West), Slovenia (West), Austria (West)
GNP per Capita: $4,510 (56th in world)
Main Airport: Ferihegy International – Budapest

Lying at the heart of central Europe, Hungary is landlocked and has borders with seven states.  Historically part of the Ottoman and Habsburg Empire, it retained some of its financial strength even when under Soviet rule in the 1950’s.

The Nemzeti Bajnokság I, or the NBI, currently named after the sponsor Soproni Liga, is the highest level of professional football in Hungary since its inception in 1901. UEFA currently ranks the league 24th in Europe. Sixteen teams compete in the league, playing each other twice, once at home and once away. At the end of the season, the top team enters the qualification for the UEFA Champions League , while the runner-up, together with the winner of the Hungarian Cup) enters the UEFA Cup qualification round. The bottom two clubs are relegated to NB2, the second-level league, to be replaced by the winners of NB2-Nyugati csoport (West) and NB2-Keleti csoport (East).

Go to Footiemap.com to gain access to their excellent graphical overview of Football in Hungary.

Previous Champions since 1990
1989/90 : Újpest (Budapest)
1990/91 : Budapest Honvéd
1991/92 : Ferencváros (Budapest)
1992/93 : Budapest Honvéd
1993/94 : Vác F.C. (Vác)
1994/95 : Ferencváros (Budapest)
1995/96 : Ferencváros (Budapest)
1996/97 : MTK Budapest
1997/98 : Újpest (Budapest)
1998/99 : MTK Budapest
1999/00 : Dunaferr FC (Dunaújváros)
2000/01 : Ferencváros (Budapest)
2001/02 : Zalaegerszeg (Zalaegerszeg)
2002/03 : MTK Budapest
2003/04 : Ferencváros (Budapest)
2004/05 : Debrecen (Debrecen)
2005/06 : Debrecen (Debrecen)
2006/07 : Debrecen (Debrecen)
2007/08 : MTK Budapest
2008/09 : Debrecen (Debrecen)

After a 5 year wait MTK became champions again in 2008, holding off the challenge of Debrecen, and securing the title with a game to spare thanks to the withdrawal from the league of Sopron.  However they had to make do with a lowly 7th place last season as the title went back to Debrecen.

Teams playing in the 2009/2010 Hungarian League season

Budapest Honvéd FC
Stadium Bozsik Jozsef Capacity: 10,000
13 times National Champions and one of the oldest and most successful in Hungary.  The basic stadium is one of the oldest in the capital.  It was orginally opened 1939, although final work was delayed until after the 2nd world war.  The stadium had its distinctive floodlights added in 1967.  Since then the capacity has slowly been reduced as the club have moved to an all seater stadium.  The stadium does suffer from having an athletics track around the edge, as well as being 3/4th uncovered.

MTK Hungária FC
Stadium Hidegkuti Nandor
Capacity: 12,700
Pictured Right
22 Times national champions, and reached the European Cup Winners Cup final in 1964.  Located 5 minutes walk south of the national stadium on the right hand side of the Pest river.  The basic Nandor stadium opened its doors in 1912 as home to MTK Budapest.  Today it is a pleasant place to watch football, although a bit sedate.  The stadium is named after one of Hungary’s most famous footballers.  The nearest train station is the Josezfaros Train station which is ajacent to the stadium.  It was also used in the film Escape to Victory.

Újpest FC
Stadium Szusza Ferenc
Capacity: 13,501
Pictured left
Another traditionally successful Hungarian club with 20 titles to their name.  They also reached the final of the 1969 Fairs Cup where they lost to Newcastle United.  They play in the north of the city.  One of the most modern stadiums in Hungary, the Szusza Ferenc is one of the best arenas for watching football in Budapest.  It has been home to Ujpest since 1922 when a velodrome on the site was converted for football use.  The stadium was partly destroyed in a flood from the River Pest in 1948, and the renovations saw it open in time to act as the national stadium whilst the Puskas was being built.

Vasas SC
Stadium Illovszky Rudolf
Capacity: 18,000
6 Times champions, and once semi-finalists of the European Cup back in 1958.  They play in the old and crumbling Rudolf stadium on the right hand banks of the River Pest.  The Illovszky is one of the most basic stadiums in Budapest.  It is an open air affair and today holds 18,000 although it has historically held up to 30,000.  Views are good from most places, although the presence of a small cinder running track and wire fencing means that you should avoid the first few rows.  Only one stand has a roof, although this only covers the back 6 rows.  Seats are plastic benches bolted onto the terraces.

Debreceni VSC – Stadium Olah Gabor utcai. Capacity: 10,200.
Champions for the previous three seasons, Debrecen have taken over the mantle as the team to beat domestically from the Budapest-based clubs.  The town of Debrecen is located in the far east of the country.  The club became the second Hungarian football club to reach the group stages of the Champions League. Debreceni VSC are the reigning Hungarian champions, having won the 2008-9 Hungarian League. Debreceni VSC has been the most successful Hungarian club since 2000. The club has won the Hungarian Champion title four times in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009. The clubs’ nickname is Loki (Lokomotiv), from its long-standing ties to the railways.

Győr ETO FC
Stadium ETO
Capacity: 16,430
Located in the north-west of the country.  They have won the title three times, the last time being in 1983.  The club are due to move to a new multi-purpose stadium, called ETO Park in the next twelve months.  The new stadium will hold 20,000 and was originally planned for the failed bid with Croatia to host the 2012 European Championships.  Gyori is a mid-size town in the north-west of the country. In 1904 the club was founded as Győri Vagongyár ETO and has undergone many name changes since. The colours of the club are green and white.

Kaposvári Rákóczi FC – Stadium Voroshadsereg ut. Capacity: 7,000.
Located close to the Croatian border in the south west of the country.  They have recently been promoted to the top division after lengthy periods in the lower leagues.  Their home stadium is Stadion Kaposvár Rákoczi. The team is named after Francis II Rákóczi, a Transylvanian prince and national hero and they are also often referred to be the nickname Somogyiak, referring to Somogy County, where the team plays.

Diósgyőri VTK
Stadium DVTK
Capacity: 11,200
Winners of the National title on three occasions, as well as playing in the UEFA Cup on a number of occasions without much success.  They play in the town of Miskolc in the north of the country, close to Slovakian border.  After the end of the club, the fans made the rebuilt of the team, and with the help of the Bőcs Sport Club, Borsod Volán SE, and the government of Miskolc. The result: the team was in the top division in 2004 again (and now there too). In 2004 the Siófok Balaton FC was replaced here and changed it name Diósgyőri Balaton FC (Diósgyőr and Balaton are about 300 kilometers away from each other). After a new owner the team was again Diósgyőri VTK. Now the owner of the club is the Szeviép constructual company (based in Szeged).

Paksi SE – Stadion Gesztenyes ut.  Capacity: 4,000
Promoted to the top division for the first time in 2006, although they came close to losing that place at the end of the season when relegation beckoned for most of the campaign.  They are located in the small town of Paks which is south of Budpaest on the River Danube.  Since its founding in 1952 it has played at either a county or national level. In 2006 it ascended to Borsodi Liga, or NB I, the top division in Hungarian football, for the first time. It plays its home games at Stadion PSE. The team colors are green and white.

FC Sopron – Stadion Varosi. Capacity: 6,500
Located on the edge of the Austrian border and lucky to stay up last season after finishing in 15th place.  They did win the Hungarian Cup in 2005 – their first honour in their history.

Auto-Trader Tatabánya FC – Stadion Varosi. Capacity: 15,500
Small club from the north of the country, close to the Austrian border.  The club were formed in 1920 although they still have not won an honour in that 90 year history.

FC Fehervar
Stadion Sostoi ut
Capacity: 18,120
Famously known as Videotron.  They reached the 1985 UEFA Cup final, beating Man Utd on the way to a final versus Real Madrid.  Szekesfehervar is located 40miles south of Budapest.  In 2005, the club changed its name to FC Fehérvar. The next year saw the club’s most successful domestic year. After a third place finish, the first in 21 years, the team finally won the Hungarian Cup for the first time by defeating Vasas SC 6-5 in a penalty shoot-out, after the match had finished 2-2 after extra time. Two years later, the team won the first edition of the Hungarian League Cup by defeating Debrecen 3-0 on aggregate (Home 3-0; Away 1-2). They won the league cup again in 2009, this time beating Pécsi FC 3-1 in the final. At the beginning of the 2009-10 season, the club reassumed the Videoton name.

Zalaegerszegi TE FC
ZTE Arena
Capacity: 16,000
Winners of the title in 2002.  ZTE were formed in 1912, yet have always been the bridesmaid’s and not the brides.  Finished in 3rd place last season.  Located in the west of the country close to the Austrian border.  During the 2002-03 UEFA Champions League, ZTE defeated Croatian champions NK Zagreb on away goals in the second qualifying round and met Manchester United in the third qualifying round. In the first leg, ZTE provided a stunning shock by winning 1-0 in Hungary with a last minute goal from Béla Koplárovics. However, in the return leg at Old Trafford, Man United won a convincing 5-0 victory. The English side progressed to the first group stage with a 5-1 aggregate victory.

Nyíregyháza Spartacus
Stadion Sostoi ut
Capacity: 10,000
Champions of the 2nd division in 2007, returning to the top division this season.  Located in the town of Nyíregyháza which is in the north east of the country.  Formed in 1959, they’ve had brief stints in the NB I., though they currently play in the second division, NB II. The team is locally referred to by their nickname, Szpari. They play in Városi Stadion, in the city sport complex just north of the downtown.

Ferencvaros Ulloi Uti Capacity: 18,100
Ferencvarosi Torna Club, or FTC as they are more popularly known, were Hungary’s most famous and successful club.  Whilst the latter is still true, the fame has been replaced by infamy as in May 2006 a decision was made to relegate the club after continued financial irregularities, the first time in their history they have played outside the top division.  They returned at the end of last season.  They are now owned by Sheffield United’s Chairman Kevin McCabe. The stadium is located in the south east corner of the city, adjacent to the main road which gives its name to the stadium.  It is on top of Népliget metro which is on Line 3 (Dark Blue) and 6 stops from the main interchange at Ferenc, and the International Bus Station opposite.  Journey time from the city centre is around 15 minutes.  Trams also run down Ulloi Ut from the old town on a regular basis, stopping at the stadium.

FOOTBALL IN BUDAPEST

FERENCVAROS – THE ULLOI UT – CAPACITY: 18,100 ALL SEATER

About the Ulloi Ut
Ulloi Uti
Capacity: 18,100
The Ulloi Ut, despite its small capacity, is one of the most famous stadiums in Hungary.  It is also the second most important stadium in the city behind the Puskás Ferenc National Stadium.  It is located in the south east of the city.  The stadium is an open air affair with three stands uncovered, and unusually the main covered stand behind the goal.  It is the south stand that is the most historical in the ground, with some of the original architecture both inside and outside the stadium.  High fences still exist around the ground.

Another unusual feature is the huge floodlights that lean ominously inwards, and are a defining monument of the whole region.  The stadium is known for its passionate fans across the whole of Europe.  Despite the problems they currently face off the pitch, the hardcore fans known as the Zöld Sasok, or Green Eagles still generate an intimidating atmosphere for visiting fans.  On occasions this has boiled over – such as the UEFA Cup match with Millwall in September 2004 when a number of the English fans were attacked in the stadium.

In years gone by big inter-city derbies were played at the National Stadium, the Puskás Ferenc which holds 66,000 spectators.  The stadium is located a few miles north east of the Ulloi Ut and can be reached by local train or metro to the Stadionok stop.  A point of trivia about the Ferenc is that it doubled as the Olympic Stadium in Steven Spielberg’s 2005 film Munich.

Who plays there?
Ferencvarosi Torna Club, or FTC as they are more popularly known, were Hungary’s most famous and successful club.  Whilst the latter is still true, the fame has been replaced by infamy as in May 2006 a decision was made to relegate the club after continued financial irregularities, the first time in their history they have played outside the top division.

The club were originally admitted into the Hungarian league in 1901, and soon starting reaping the success that would characterise their history.  In that first decade the club won the title on five occasions.  To date they have won 28 Championship titles, the last one being in 2004.  Based on their current situation it is not likely that they will repeat this feat any time soon.  They have also won the Hungarian Cup on twenty occasions.

They are also the most successful Hungarian team in terms of European competition having won the Fairs Cup (the pre-runner to the UEFA Cup) by beating Juventus in 1965.  In 1996 they qualified for the Champions League group stages for the first time, gaining 5 points from their group matches with Real Madrid, Ajax and Grasshoppers.  The following season they lost in the qualifying rounds to Göteborg.

In May 2005 they met Sopron in the final of the Hungarian cup at the Puskás stadium.  In a stormy match three Ferencvaros players saw red cards in a game which saw them lose the cup.  As a mark of protest, the management and the remaining 8 players refuse to attend the medal presentation, leading to further censorship for the club.

Since their enforced exile in the 2nd division of Hungarian football they have found life tough, and although they came close to promotion in 2007/08 it was not to be and so another season in the lower leagues awaits them.

How to get there
The stadium is located in the south east corner of the city, adjacent to the main road which gives its name to the stadium.  It is on top of Népliget metro which is on Line 3 (Dark Blue) and 6 stops from the main interchange at Ferenc, and the International Bus Station opposite.  Journey time from the city centre is around 15 minutes.  Trams also run down Ulloi Ut from the old town on a regular basis, stopping at the stadium.

For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

Getting a ticket
Hungarian football is currently in a state of crises.  Crowds are down by over 11% year on year, and the average attendance in the Arany Azsok Liga have dropped to an all time low of less than 3,000.  Since their enforced relegation Ferencvaros’s crowds have dropped to below 3,000 meaning that there are plenty of seats to be had on a match by match basis.  Tickets can be purchased from the ticket windows on their side of the stadium in the run up to the game, or alternatively you can email the club on ftc@ftc.hu.

Ticket prices range from 1.600Ft in the side stands, to 400Ft behind the goal.  A safe bet for the neutral is in sectors A and B in the corner of the main stand which cost 1.100Ft.

HONVED – STADION JOZSEF BOZSIK – CAPACITY 13,500

About Jozsef Bozsik
Ujtemeto ut 1-3
Capacity: 13,500
The basic stadium is one of the oldest in the capital.  It was orginally opened 1939, although final work was delayed until after the 2nd world war.  The stadium had its distinctive floodlights added in 1967.  Since then the capacity has slowly been reduced as the club have moved to an all seater stadium.  The stadium does suffer from having an athletics track around the edge, as well as being 3/4th uncovered.

Who Plays There?
The stadium is home to Budapest Honved, one of the country’s most historic clubs.  They were originally formed in 1926 as Kispest FC, beforing renaming themselves as Honved in 1944.  In the 1950’s they became the team of the Hungarian Army and went on an impressive spree in the decade winning four titles, and getting themselves a nickname as the Mighty Magyars.  That team includes the legendary Puskas as well as Jozsef Boszik.  After the title in 1955 they had to wait twenty five years for another one, and actually dominated football again in the 1980’s with titles in 1980, 1984, 1985 (the double), 1986, 1988 and the double again in 1989.  Two more titles in the 1990’s secured their place as the most successful team in Hungarian football in recent times.  Their most recent success has been the 2007 Hungarian Cup Final.

How to get a ticket
With attendances struggling to hit the 2,000 mark, it is not hard to get a ticket to see Honved play.  Tickets are sold from the booths outside the stadium.  A basic ticket around the edges of the stadium start from HUF 1,400. A ticket for the covered main stand (the Puskas Tribune) cost HUF 2,200.  Tickets are also sold from a number of retail outlets around the city including all IBUSZ outlets.

How to get there
The Jozsef Bozsik is located in the south west of the city.  The nearest train station to the stadium is at Kispest which is a 5 minute walk from the stadium.  This is on the main south eastern suburban line from Josevfaros station.

For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

STADION PUSKAS FERENC – CAPACITY: 68,976

About the Puskas Ferenc
Istvanmezei ut 3
Capacity: 69,000
The national stadium sits lonely in the west of the city of Budapest, and once held over 104,000 spectators.  Today the capacity is a more modest 69,000, although it is still along time since the stadium was even half full.  The stadium was constructed between 1948 and 1953 as part of the World War 2 repatriations.  One of the first games played in the stadium was the 7-1 defeat of England in 1954.  The stadium was originally named as the Nepstadion – the People’s Stadium, although it was recently renamed in honour of the most famous player in Hungarian history.

The stadium is a classic eastern bloc arena which has a wide athletics track, large open banked terraces (now converted to seating) and very imposing floodlights. The stadium also doubled as Munich’s Olympic Stadium for the filming of Steven Speilberg’s 2005 film Munich.

Who Plays There?
The stadium is home to the national team, as well as the annual venue for the Hungarian Cup Finals.

Getting a ticket
If you want to watch a national team game you will have little problem in buying tickets on the day.  It has been over 20 years since the stadium sold out, and more recently corwds have struggled to break the 10,000 mark.

How to get there
The stadium is located in the east of the city.  It is well served by public transport, the easiest way is by metro on line red M2 to Stadionok and then simply follow the statue path to the ground.  Alternatively, main line railway station Keleti is a 5 minute walk to the west of the stadium.

For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

VASAS – STADION ILLOVSZKY RUDOLF – CAPACITY: 18,000

About the Illovszky Rudolf
Fay Utica 58
Capacity: 18,000
The Illovszky is one of the most basic stadiums in Budapest.  It is an open air affair and today holds 18,000 although it has historically held up to 30,000.  Views are good from most places, although the presence of a small cinder running track and wire fencing means that you should avoid the first few rows.  Only one stand has a roof, although this only covers the back 6 rows.  Seats are plastic benches bolted onto the terraces.

Who Plays There?
The basic stadium is home to SC Vasas, a multi-sport club based in the north of the city.  The club were formed in 1911 as a team from the local steel works.  They have won six championships – the main period between 1957 and 1966 when they won 5.  Their last honour was in 1986 when the won the Hungarian Cup.  In 2006 the club should have actually been relegated as they finished in 2nd from last place.  However, due to the financial irregularities of Ferencvaros, Vasas were saved.

How to get a ticket
With average attendances struggling to reach 1,500, tickets are not hard to come by on the day of a game.  They can be purchased from the small office in the main stand or from the ticket windows on Fay Utca.  A ticket in the main stand costs HUF1,200 and elsewhere in the stadium for HUF 1,000.

How to get there
Arpad Hid bus station is a ten minute walk south of the stadium as too is the Metro station on Line M3 of Forgach Utca.  To find the stadium continue to walk northwards on Vaci Utca until you reach Fay Utca on right hand side – stadium is 700metres down this road.  Alternatively catch tram 14 from Lehel Tar to the stop outside the Oriental Hotel called Frangpan – the stadium is 100yards on the left.  For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

Upjest – STADION SZUSZA FERENC – CAPACITY: 13,501

About the Szusza Ferenc
Megyeri ut 13
Capacity: 13,501
One of the most modern stadiums in Hungary, the Szusza Ferenc is one of the best arenas for watching football in Budapest.  It has been home to Ujpest since 1922 when a velodrome on the site was converted for football use.  The stadium was partly destroyed in a flood from the River Pest in 1948, and the renovations saw it open in time to act as the national stadium whilst the Puskas was being built.  In October 1948 the record attendance for the stadium of 50,000 saw Hungary play Austria.  More recently thet stadium has been used on numerous occasions for the national team, although attendances tend to struggle to get over the 5,000 mark.  The last game played here was the 2-0 win versus Malta in October 2007.

The stadium offers comforts beyond belief it you have been to any other stadiums in the city.  It has a roof, good leg room and the absence of a athletics track is a real bonus for fans.  Average league attendances of just over 3,000 make the club one of the best supported in the league.

Who Plays There?
Twenty league titles and 8 Hungarian Cup victories make Ujpest one of the most successful teams in Hungarian football history.  They are part of a larger sporting organisation that includes an Ice Hockey team, Waterpolo and Athletics.  The club were formed originally in 1885, although it was another 15 years before the football team played their first game.  Just after World War 2 the club were adopted as the official Police team, a move which co-incided with a period on inactivity.  It wasn’t until the end of the 1960’s that the team rose to prominance again, including their most famous games when they reach the UEFA Cup (known as the Inter-City Fairs Cup) in 1969 when they lost 6-2 on aggregate to Newcastle United.

The 1970’s were a golden period for the club as they won 8 titles out of a possible 10, although they could not make an impact in their subsequent European Cup campaigns.  With the fall of the Communist government, funding was scarce on the ground and the club had to wait over 10 years for another title in 1989.  Since then a single title in 1998 has been their only reward.

Getting a Ticket
Tickets can be purchased in advance by calling +6 1 231 0088 or by emailing the club atujpestfc@ujpestfc.hu and they will reserve one for you to be picked up on the day.  Alternatively tickets can be purchased from the ticket office on the day of the game.  The most expensive seats are in the Tribune which are HUF3,000 for normal games and 3,500 for the games against the main Budapest rivals.  Tickets for the stands behind the goals are HUF2,000 and HUF 1,500 respectively.

How to get there
The stadium is located in the north of the city, close to the right banks of the River Pest.  There is a train station, known as Ujpest a 10 minute walk south of the stadium.  Metro line M3 (Blue) runs to a terminus at Ujpest Kozpont.  Alternatively bus lines 30, 96, 104 and 122 run to the Metro terminus.  For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

MTK – STADION HIDEGKUTI NANDOR – CAPACITY: 12,700

About the Hidegkuti Nandor Stadion
Salgotarjani ut 12
Capacity:12,700
The basic Nandor stadium opened its doors in 1912 as home to MTK Budapest.  Today it is a pleasant place to watch football, although a bit sedate.  The stadium is named after one of Hungary’s most famous footballers.  The stadium was demolished during the second world war, and not used again until 1947.  Since 1995 the stadium has been undergoing renovated, although there is no date for the finish of the work, and no real clue as to what they have actually done!  On a matchday only the two side stands are open – the main covered stand offers the more comfortable viewing platform.

For a look at the stadium in more detail go to my YouTube.com page.

Who plays there?
MTK Budapest are one of the most successful teams in Hungarian history, with 22 league titles.  However the club will always be associated with the Secret Police after they were “adopted” in 1949.  They ended a fiver year for a championship in 2007/08 when they pipped Debrecen to the title on the last weekend of the season.To watch MTK in action go to my YouTube.com page.

Getting a Ticket
With crowds struggling to get above the 1,000 mark, it is not difficult to get a ticket for a game to see MTK.  The ticket windows by the main stand (which seem to double up as the woman’s toilets!) and cost either 1,800Ft for a seat in the upper (covered) part of the main stand, 1,200Ft for the lower part or 600Ft for the uncovered side stand opposite.

How to get there
The stadium is located a 5 minute walk south of the national stadium.  The nearest train station is the Josezfaros Train station which is ajacent to the stadium.   For an overview of who plays where in Budapest, go to Footiemap.com to access their excellent graphical guide to football in the city.

Getting around
Public transport in Budapest is well covered with services provided by BKV, who operate the buses, trolleybuses, trams, suburban railway lines, the metro and boats around the city.  The tram network is extensive, and reliable despite poor track infrastructure and an ageing fleet. Routes 4 and 6 combined form the busiest traditional city tram line in the world, with 50-metre long trains running at 60 to 90 second intervals at peak time.  There are 3 metro lines and a 4th is about to be constructed. The Yellow line, built in 1896, is one of the oldest lines in the world.  A 48 hour Budapest Card costs 6,500Fts allows free transport on all lines.  Be warned, the metro system is heavily patrolled with revenue protection officers who show no mercy!

Nearest Airport – Budapest Ferihegy (BUD)
Telephone:              +36 296 7000
Website:                  http://www.bud.hu

Budapest’s only airport is located 10 miles south east of the city centre and is the busiest airport in the country, handling around 8 million passengers.  It has three terminals, with the newer terminal 1 being used mainly by the budget airlines.  From the UK, British Airwaysfly here from London Heathrow, Easyjet from London Gatwick and Luton, Jet2 from Manchester, Malev Airlines from London Gatwick, Ryanair from Bristol and Nottingham East Midlands and Wizz Air from London Luton.

To reach the city centre catch one of the regular Bus 200 services that run to Köbanya-Kispest metro station where you can continue your journey by train.  Alternatively, Bus 93 runs along the same route.  It takes around 20 minutes to reach Deák Ferenc Square and a one way ticket costs 230FT.  A direct rail link has recenly opened and is accessible by turning left out of the terminal and following the path.  The line into the city centre (and Nguyo Station and NOT any other one advertised by Easyjet) is the 1st one.  Tickets are 300Ft and have to be bought in advance from the information desk in the terminal

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